Sunday, February 27, 2011

Typewriter cravings



I have long waffled about typewriters -- I'm so attached to my fountain pens, after all -- but I think I've finally decided I want one. Maybe. My best beloved says it will be much too loud, and the keys will require a lot of effort, so I suppose I'd better test one out...

...but I know I adore their image! It's like the meta aspect of loving stationery that includes writing themes like pens, or envelopes, or stamps. I think typewriter stationery and postcards are just the bee's knees.

So I created an etsy treasury of some adorable typewriter-themed paper goods. I want 'em all. Etsy is a dangerous place...

If you want to learn more about each item, do visit my typewriter cravings treasury; but as far as I understand the workings of the widget above, each image should be its own clickable link to the individual etsy item, too.

EDIT: Reading the Life in a Typewriter shop blog just fans the flames...

19 comments:

  1. I think eery mail artist should have a typewriter -- so many fun things you can do. You don't have to type pages of letters, you can type random comments and cut and paste. And I find the noise very comforting....

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  2. I have an old typewriter, but it's electric, but it's still pretty. I really want a real one though.

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  3. I grew up banging out term papers and real estate documents (my first job) on a manual Royal, a boatanchor of a beast weighing in at some 40 pounds, battleship gray with green keys. I can attest to the fact the charm of using a typewriter will be gone after the first couple of paragraphs. The stress on the finger and wrist joints is brutal. Plus trying to set the margins and tabs takes an advanced degree in astrophysics.

    My advice is to borrow a friend's manual for the weekend and type away to get it all out of your system, then buy lots and lots of cute typewriter stationery. Then give your computer keyboard a big hug. :)

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  4. Speck, your comments just made me laugh out loud.

    I am very prone to RSI - repetitive strain injury - and had years of wrist pain from improper keyboard typing/positioning. So I'm very wary... and perhaps I'd just better have fun with my stationery, and be thankful that fountain pens cause very little strain.

    I do intend to PLAY with a typewriter... but I don't know anyone nearby who has one. I do plan a field trip to a typewriter store in Boston sometime, though, and that may cure me of my desires.

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  5. If you want just a few words of typewriter font to paste on snail mail art, I recommend Batik Regular font in MS Word. A typewritten word looks just like that when the ribbon needs replacing.

    Batik Regular font link

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  6. Well, my night was just ruined. After reading your post, I thought of my grandmother's old typewriter and went to dig it out of the basement, and my dad told me he threw it out. Sucky, since that's one of the only things we still had from her.

    Nevertheless, I agree with what Speck said!

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  7. Remember taking typing class in high school? I don't think they are teaching it anymore. These kids nowadays just know how to type (well, text) with their thumbs. I'm glad I can type but I'll never be as fast as my mom, who was a secretary for years.

    Re: Etsy. I'm addicted to it and I love it when people feature the coolest of goods from there! Thanks.

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  8. I have three typewriters - two Smith-Corona electrics (one cursive, one standard) and a manual Hermes 3000 that needs a new ribbon before I can use it, but is a superadorable mint green. I don't find them too difficult to type on, and I don't bother to set the margins - I just put the paper in roughly where I want to start typing and go until I'm close to the edge, then hit return. I can't imagine a house without typewriters.

    But before investing a lot of money finding out you don't like them as much as you thought, keep an eye for them in their cases in thrift stores. I've picked up all of mine for under $15 that way, and as long as you hit every button to make sure the metal arm of each letter isn't sticky and will come up (and plug in and do the same on any electric ones), you're good.

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  9. Chandlerguera: Here's an odd tidbit about me. My 9th grade year is when my high school taught typing, and that year was one of the last years they taught on typewriters instead of computers. I tested out of typing, though, because I could already type 100wpm. My mom made me learn in middle school, on a computer; it's a valuable skill, as in my younger days I temped as a type/tape transcriptionist.

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  10. Here's another blog that might tempt you:
    http://clickthing.blogspot.com/

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  11. Proud member of the typosphere checking in here.

    I must first disagree heartily with Speck. Typewriting is something that does not lose its charm after the first few paragraphs. There is something that is inherently romantic about watching the words translate from your fingers to the type bars to the paper. You, if you are like most of us, will fall in love after those first few paragraphs.

    Admittedly, typewriting can be hard on the hands and fingers. However, the proper machine can do wonders to mitigate this. Tom, from Life in a Typewriter Shop, he can help you find a machine that will not cause that sort of injury--I have a Royal Quiet DeLuxe that feels just like I'm typing on a traditional computer keyboard--it's all in the machine choice. You wouldn't want a machine that hasn't been used in a while or was designed for a light touch. That said, there are plenty out there that would feel perfect to your fingers.

    Next, check out strikethru.net. She's got the best collection of links in the typosphere--there's a lot of us out there that I think can only make your wanting a typewriter worse.

    art
    arsdecarta

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  12. Proud member of the typosphere checking in here.

    I must first disagree heartily with Speck. Typewriting is something that does not lose its charm after the first few paragraphs. There is something that is inherently romantic about watching the words translate from your fingers to the type bars to the paper. You, if you are like most of us, will fall in love after those first few paragraphs.

    Admittedly, typewriting can be hard on the hands and fingers. However, the proper machine can do wonders to mitigate this. Tom, from Life in a Typewriter Shop, he can help you find a machine that will not cause that sort of injury--I have a Royal Quiet DeLuxe that feels just like I'm typing on a traditional computer keyboard--it's all in the machine choice. You wouldn't want a machine that hasn't been used in a while or was designed for a light touch. That said, there are plenty out there that would feel perfect to your fingers.

    Next, check out strikethru.net. She's got the best collection of links in the typosphere--there's a lot of us out there that I think can only make your wanting a typewriter worse.

    art
    arsdecarta

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  13. Love, love, love the images you have chosen! Now I'm too afraid to go visit any on Etsy as I know I will easily succumb.

    Oh, what to do?!

    Jackie
    Letters & Journals

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  14. Ohhh, I found my Beastly Boatanchor Royal on Etsy here:

    Professional Royal Typewriter

    The actual Beastly Boatanchor is sitting in my sister's garage as we speak. I'm not sure why.

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  15. you're absolutely right--etsy is dangerous! i have three manual typewriters in various states of disrepair. it took me so long to figure out to install the ribbon in just one of them that i gave up. but they are nice to look at :)

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  16. Hey Missive,
    Totally off topic- I found out today that Bob Slate is going out of business at the end of March. I'm really heartbroken about it. I thought you would want to know.
    -F

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  17. Felicity - I know. I've known for a while. It's heartbreaking indeed.

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  18. Felicity: WHAT? No!!

    Shoot, shoot, I wasn't planning to be in Boston before late April. And wouldn't you know I already have a big shopping list for them.

    Thanks for the heads-up! I might try to get out there before they close down! Oh my gosh what awful news!!!

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  19. Another member of the typosphere here. I echo what Art has written -- there are machines that take virtually no effort to use. The Royal Quiet De Luxe and the Olympia SM-9 are two that come to mind. Each individual machine is different, though.

    I am also an avid fountain pen user (as well as typewriter user) and they are great, too, so stick with what you like. Just keep in mind that there are very nice typewriters out there that work like a dream.

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