Saturday, July 18, 2009

Home again, home again, hippity hop

Hello gentle readers,
No photo now, just a tired note to say I have returned from a wonderful escape into nature. I don't have any pictures of my letter pile, but I do have a count: 37 pieces of personal correspondence awaited me today upon my return. I think about 8 or so were postcards, the rest letters. I've just read them all, in my leisure hours after unpacking. The letter-stream will resume tomorrow (though I did send out 20 postcards & 1 letter while I was in a cabin by a lake), and I'll be back with regular photo-posts tomorrow, too.
Thanks for all your comments while I was away, and your continued loyal readership!

7 comments:

  1. Welcome home!

    Btw, I didn't add to that pile, while you were away. I'll let you get your "letter-writing sea legs" back under you. :-)

    But I am saving a "special" home made envelope for you. -grin-

    'Dear you,'

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  2. As my home made envelopes get more "wild," I sometimes wonder if they will be rejected by the P.O. -gigggles- And if they were, how would I know, hu? Unless they send 'rejects' back to sender. ,-)

    'Dear you,'

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  3. I would be surprised if the USPS rejected anything due to content: that would be censorship, though I suppose such rules must exist. Interesting question. As to shape or other requirements, I would suspect they wouldn't be rejected, but instead delivered with postage due. Anyone else have guesses about that?

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  4. There was a curious experiment done on this very issue. As it would appear from the results, virtually anything (provided it's not contraband) will be delivered by the United States Postal Service.

    http://improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume6/v6i4/postal-6-4.html

    James

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  5. James, that's fantastic stuff! I do note a couple of "never received" items, though.

    Also - this experiment was copyright 2000. Rules for mailing have changed dramatically since 9/11. Now anything over a certain weight must be left at a postal counter and not in a bin or for pickup at an address. Too bad... I wonder how much of that stuff could go through now.

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  6. M.M., good catch on the date of publication. I mentioned "virtually" everything because, you're right, a couple of items were never delivered - including rotten food, if I recall. In any case, I'm sure that a few wild and/or racy envelopes would make delivery. After all, the USPS accepts all those Abercrombie and Victoria's Secret catalogs!

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  7. Oh yes - I've sent a few wild and racy envelopes meself.

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