Sunday, August 16, 2009

Kneeding a lift

Kneeding a lift

I sent this vintage-image postcard to Chris of Wild Postcards and Girls Go Postal in response to his "Closing a formal social note" postcard that I blogged about yesterday.

The image is some kind of vintage pin-up from the 1940s, though the postcard itself is not vintage but a modern reproduction. Of course Chris has long since beat me to it, and blogged about this last month. Chris, you are way more on top of it than I am!

9 comments:

  1. The image of the girl trying to hitch a ride some where is refreshing. I like that she actually has some weight on her as shown by her legs that are exposed. Today there has been such an enthesis on being thin and men can be really judgmental of women when they think they weight too much. There is no way we women can live up to such extreme and unrealistic expectations. It is nice to see an old image of the woman with a little extra weight on her as oppose to the twiggy models of the sixties.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great point, Tascha - and she still looks plenty slender to me! That's one of the reasons I get such a kick out of 40s pinup artwork: it's rarely all that risque, and the women have real curves.

    ReplyDelete
  3. yes I agree with both of you . No wonder we have so many food related issues with young girls these days because of unrealistic images . Why did our mothers and grandmothers not have image issues because women's pictures were real back then . Not air brushed like they are now and also no sixtys stick thin models . I agree the woman in the postcard looks good and healthy and still attractive . this postcard could teach a lesson .great blog and got me to thinking as you can probably tell . LOL !!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well, Perhaps for the 1940s and 50s etc they were considered risque. But by todays standards they are not. It is like when I read the novel The Awakening by Kate Chopin. I had read a short story by her in college and the teacher mentioned her novel and said how risque it was etc. But a few years later after I found the book and read it I could not see why it was considered risque at all. It was about a woman who was thinking about and planning to have an affair with a younger man but he backed out on her in the last minute so spare her reputation and nothing actually happened. Now for Victorian times this might be considered a risky story but in modern times it is not. I was thinking afterwards so she was thinking about having an affair. Nothing happened! Wheres the risk? It would be risque if she carried out the affair, if her intended fellow adultrer did not back out leraving her with only a note. So I think you get my point

    ReplyDelete
  5. To coin a phrase (and to repeat myself), I brake for gams. The beauty in this card, and in the pose, isn't in what it shows, but what it doesn't. I may be an aberration, but just the hint of garters is far more tantalizing than a full view of what they might be connected to.

    I must also agree with what you perceptive ladies have to say about weight and image issues. This broad is broad where a broad should be broad.

    P.S. You need a scanner!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Chris - I have a scanner. I prefer photographs.

    ReplyDelete
  7. When I first got my computer scanners were the thing needed. People wanted me to scan them pictures of myself right and left and I neither had a scanner or pictures of myself to scan. Now cams are what is considered the norm online and I get inuindated right and left to turn my cam on which I do not do much anymore much to other peoples dismay. Why do people assume that if you have a computer you must have a scanner or a web cam and you must use it? They are YOUR equipment and it is your choice to use them or not. Anyway, I have been visiting Ilonas blog for quite some time and I think her photographs are great. What would scaning them do for them? They come across clear and beautiful. I have no complaints about the quality of her photographs. And there is no improvements a scanner could make of them.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Well, at least if I used a scanner, the postcards would be flat. But I prefer photos in natural light - to each his own.

    ReplyDelete